Pacific Northwest


Succulentopedia

Sedum divergens (Spreading Stonecrop)

Sedum divergens (Spreading Stonecrop) is a sprawling succulent with branched stems that root at the nodes and glossy green or reddish…


Fast Growing Trees in the Pacific Northwest

The fast growing trees of a region are most often the native trees since these trees are most adapted to the specific climate of the region. The Pacific Northwest is home to the world’s largest stands of coniferous trees like spruces, firs and redwoods. These and other native trees cover the islands and the coastal slopes in the Pacific Northwest region from Oregon to Central Alaska. The Pacific Northwest has 134 native and naturalized trees. The fastest growing trees of the region include the pacific silver fir, native spruce, Alaska cedar, the common juniper and the redwood trees.


General Identification Tips

Plants are identified by their particular characteristics. Take note of the plant's leaves. Leaves can grow opposite one another or in alternating patterns up the stem. Additionally, their margins, or edges, can be smooth, lobed or serrated. Many Pacific Northwest plants, such as the native Nootka rose and evegreen huckleberry, also produce flowers and fruit. Once you have a complete list of leaf, flower and fruit characteristics, you will be better able to identify your plant with the help of a plant identification guidebook.

  • The Pacific Northwest consists of a diverse region of landscapes stretching from British Columbia through Washington State to Oregon.
  • Many Pacific Northwest plants, such as the native Nootka rose and evegreen huckleberry, also produce flowers and fruit.

Frost Dates

Region 2 gardeners face a relatively late growing season from roughly May 31 to Aug. 31. In Washington, lower altitude and coastal areas may have last frost as early as April 6 and as late as early November. Frost can be a problem for fruits and vegetables that take longer to mature. Check with your local extension service, which will have the late frost records for your specific location to help you know when to safely plant. In Washington, it's a good idea to plant varieties that mature more quickly.


Watch the video: The Pacific 2010 The Battle of Okinawa: Reduction of the Shuri Bastion


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