Friend or foe: which plants and shrubs should not be fed with ash


Wood ash is a source of potassium and phosphorus, so it is often used by gardeners and gardeners as fertilizer. But it turns out that not every plant will benefit from it. The reason is that ash is not only a full-fledged source of nutrition for various horticultural crops, it is also capable of alkalizing the soil. What plants benefit, and who harm the ash feeding?

Rational and competent use of wood ash in the garden and vegetable garden will definitely help to solve many problems - to nourish the plants or reduce the acidity of the soil. If you use ash wisely in the beds, there will be no trouble.


Ash is an excellent natural fertilizer for horticultural crops

Ash contains a huge amount of nutrients and trace elements that improve the growth and fruiting of plants. This is not only wood ash, residues from burning leaves, branches or grass are also suitable. This top dressing saturates the soil with phosphorus and potassium. But it is worth remembering that not all crops need wood fertilizers.

You can read more about how to use ash for a garden, indoor plants, and other natural dressings on the Dachny Year website https://dachni-god.ru/category/udobreniya.


Recommendations for application

But still, ash should be used for soil cultivation periodically. The main thing is to do it right.

  1. You should not simultaneously add ash with droppings, phosphate and nitrogen fertilizers to the ground. It is also not advisable to simultaneously saturate the earth with organic matter for decay. All this leads to less absorption of nutrients by plants, which makes feeding useless.
  2. Dolomite flour and wood ash are the strongest alkalizing agents of the earth, so choose one of them.
  3. To ensure that the nutrients are well absorbed by plants in the right quantities, mix wood ash with ammonium nitrate in equal proportions before use.
  4. It is not recommended to exceed a dose of 1 glass for one square meter. Also, make sure that the level of soil acidity is no more than 7 Ph.
  5. To improve the quality of the land in the garden, ash as fertilizer is used mainly in the fall, when the entire crop has already been harvested.

The vegetable garden is useful, but not always fertilize with ash. Carefully study the composition of the soil and acidity, the requirements of the crops, and only then decide whether ash can be used as a fertilizer or a pest control.


Ash and different types of soil

When using ash as fertilizer for flowers, one of its main features should be taken into account - it causes alkalization of the soil. If ash fertilizers are used on alkaline soils, this will negatively affect the condition of the plants.

Loamy and clayey soils can be made looser and more breathable by adding dry ash when preparing the potting mix.

Important! By adding ash, you can regulate the acidity of the soil - the chemicals in its composition reduce the acid content.

If a houseplant needs acidic lands for full growth and flowering, then you cannot use ash top dressing.


Plants that cannot be fertilized with ash

Firstly, plants that prefer acidic soils should not be supplemented with ash. These include watermelons, blueberries, radishes, sorrel, hydrangea, heather, azalea. Also, various conifers (juniper, spruce, thuja, larch, fir) do not like this additive.

Secondly, ash should not be mixed with manure (horse, poultry, chicken, etc.) and mineral additives based on ammonia (saltpeter, urea, etc.). In this case, the effectiveness of both additives will be minimal, because one will interfere with the assimilation of the other.

It will be ineffective to mix the ash feeding with fertilizers containing phosphorus, because this composition will slow down the absorption of the last substance.

If you mix ash with an alkaline ingredient (such as dolomite flour), they create a highly alkaline environment that will not benefit your plants.

You should not use this dressing for immature seedlings, because it contains a large amount of mineral salts.

If you are able to periodically measure soil acidity, then do not use ash if the pH is> 7.


As I said, ash deacidifies the soil. Of course, basically all plants in the garden prefer slightly acidic, neutral or slightly alkaline soils. However, there is a small group of plants, the so-called acidophiles, that grow better in sour soils. Therefore, it is not recommended to fertilize them with ash. These include rhododendrons, hydrangea, garden azalea, heathers. Of the "edible" crops, acidic soils like sorrel and radish, so we don't feed them with ash either.

It is necessary to use ash as fertilizer following several rules.

1. You need to store ash in dry location. If it gets wet and kept damp, it will lose all its beneficial properties, potassium will leave the ash.

2. It is impossible to mix ash with such organic fertilizers, like manure, bird droppings, because ash will make them virtually useless, reducing the nitrogen content in them.

3. Not recommended combine feeding with ash and superphosphate, as as a result, phosphorus will be poorly absorbed.

4. Do not add ash together with dolomite flour, because all these preparations reduce the acidity of the soil. If we add them along with the ash, there will be a double effect that can be disastrous.

I really like to use ash in the garden, it is my real helper. However, you should always follow the recommendations so as not to harm the plant with your dressings.


Firstly, plants that prefer acidic soils should not be supplemented with ash. These include watermelons, blueberries, radishes, sorrel, hydrangea, heather, azalea. Also, various conifers (juniper, spruce, thuja, larch, fir) do not like this additive.

Secondly, ash should not be mixed with manure (horse, poultry, chicken, etc.) and mineral additives based on ammonia (saltpeter, urea, etc.). In this case, the effectiveness of both additives will be minimal, because one will interfere with the assimilation of the other.

If you mix ash with an alkaline ingredient (such as dolomite flour), they create a highly alkaline environment that will not benefit your plants.

If you are able to periodically measure soil acidity, then do not use ash if the pH is> 7.


Potato peelings as fertilizer. How and what plants to fertilize?

How to use potato peelings as vegetable garden fertilizer?

What plants need to be fertilized with potato peelings?

Potato peelings are loved as fertilizer squash, zucchini, currants, raspberries, strawberries, cucumbers, pumpkin, watermelon, melon, radish, radish, onion, garlic, as well as seedlings.

Raw purifications are either dried, frozen, or used fresh. In the first case, flour is subsequently obtained, fertilized directly with it, or gruel is prepared by pouring hot water over the flour. Frozen and fresh cleanings are used to prepare the infusion, they are poured with boiling water, kept for a day, then the infusion is used for watering (by the way, indoor plants will also be very happy with potato watering).

In any case, cleaning must first rinse well, pat dry with a towel. If you want to dry them, choose a ventilated area. Sunlight is completely unnecessary for cleaning.

Video in the topic:

I know the use of potato peelings as fertilizer for a long time, they need to be dried, preferably in the oven.

Throughout the winter we collect the peelings, put them in a bag, and in the spring we begin to dry, before plowing the garden for planting potatoes, sprinkle the potato peelings with wood ash and scatter the peelings over the beds.

You can also make an infusion of potato peelings, pour boiling water over the dried peelings, leave for 1 day and water the seedlings in the beds, flowers, trees.

The gruel that remains can be buried next to the seedlings, which are more damaged by aphids, Colorado potato beetle, scabbard, moth.

Cucumbers, pumpkin, and cabbage are especially fond of this infusion.

Under the berry bushes, you can simply bury dry potato peelings in a circle.

Just today I learned that potato peelings are useful for currants. At what plan? It turns out that if dry potato peels are buried under currant bushes during the spring and summer, then the currant berries will be large! Or you can pour boiling water over the cleaning and water the bushes in a cooled form.

Potato peelings can also be used as fertilizer when planting cucumbers and cabbage. They must be crushed to a mushy mixture, and put in each hole when planting seeds or seedlings.

There is a lot of starch in cleaning, which currants like. It is necessary not to be lazy and dry the peelings from potatoes in winter. And in the spring, apply them to fertilize currants, cabbage, cucumbers. You can fertilize the currants by simply digging up the cousins ​​along with the cleanings or brew and grind into the cleaning gruel. When planting seedlings, you need to lay the prepared gruel in each hole, sprinkle it with earth, and then plant a plant in this hole.

If you're still throwing away potato peels, it's time to turn waste into income. It's time to dry the potato peelings - they are an excellent fertilizer for many vegetable and fruit and berry plants. It is especially useful to use them when planting zucchini, pumpkin, cabbage, cucumbers, fertilize currants and strawberries. But for planting potatoes, tomatoes and eggplants, they should not be used, so as not to bring diseases inherent in potatoes.

Just do not lay it out on the surface, so as not to attract slugs and Colorado beetles, although you can do that as traps.

Dry crushed cleanings are poured with boiling water, this gruel is placed in the holes, sprinkled with earth and seedlings are planted, and you can simply bury it under the currants.

Potato skins can be harvested, dried in the oven and folded into a cloth bag. And as soon as it's time to plant seedlings in the garden, add a handful of prepared cleanings as fertilizer to each hole.

The point is that potatoes themselves contain many nutrients. With this fertilizer, vegetables grow by leaps and bounds. Even finicky squash seedlings, pumpkin seedlings and squash seedlings are best taken in open soil.

Potato peelings are the same organic fertilizer that is very rich primarily in starch, but they also contain other substances useful for many plants. So you can use potato peels just like any other organic waste - for example, using them in a compost heap or making a decoction of potato peels. Often, advanced gardeners collect and dry potato peelings all winter long, so that they can then be laid in holes for cucumbers, zucchini and pumpkins, as well as fertilized with them for cabbage and onions. Good results are obtained by feeding with potato peelings of black currant bushes, for which the peelings are sprinkled with earth near the roots and spilled with hot water.

The only thing for which it is not recommended to use potato peelings is to fertilize the potatoes themselves and other nightshades - after all, in this way you can bring some kind of disease from old peelings to new plants.


Watch the video: Friend or Foe


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